15 Different Types of Kingsnakes

Different Types of Kingsnakes
Photo by Kapa65

In the world of snakes, there are many different types of kingsnakes. While some kingsnakes look similar, others can be distinguished by their size and markings alone.

Here are several different types of kingsnakes you might come across during your travels.

1. Common Kingsnake

The common kingsnake is a constrictor snake found in North and Central America. These snakes are non-venomous and kill their prey by wrapping their bodies around it and squeezing it until it suffocates.

These different types of Kingsnakes come in various colors, but the most common are black with white bands or brown with black bands. 

These snakes can grow to be anywhere from 2 to 5 feet long. They eat small mammals, lizards, other snakes, birds, and eggs. Common kingsnakes are active during the day and will only live near water if they are not hunting for food. 

They do not lay eggs like other species of snakes but instead give birth to live young. The baby kingsnakes will remain with their mother for up to two years before they set off on their own.

2. California Kingsnake

The California kingsnake is a subspecies of the common kingsnake. It is found in the southwestern United States and Mexico. The California kingsnake is black with white bands. It grows to be about 3-4 feet long. 

The California kingsnake is a non-venomous snake. It will often coil up into a ball or strike at its attacker when threatened. These different types of kingsnakes are not aggressive but will bite if threatened or handled. 

3. California Mountain Kingsnake

The California mountain kingsnake is a subspecies of the common kingsnake, and they are found in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These types of kingsnakes are black with white bands and can grow to 3 feet long. 

They are non-venomous and eat small mammals, lizards, and birds. They are also good climbers and can move quickly, and sometimes they will use their speed to escape predators by moving up into trees.

4. Gray Banded Kingsnake

The gray-banded kingsnake is a subspecies of the common kingsnake found in the southwestern United States and Mexico. It is a small snake, usually only reaching about 3 feet in length. 

The gray-banded kingsnake is a famous pet snake due to its docile nature and beautiful coloration. These different types of kingsnakes can be found in many habitats, including grasslands, deserts, marshes, woodland edges, and prairies. 

They are most often seen at night since they are nocturnal animals. They prey on rodents like mice or rats, using their venomous bite to paralyze them before swallowing them whole.

5. Mexican Kingsnake

The Mexican is a subspecies of kingsnake found in Mexico and Central America. They are often mistaken for evil due to their striking resemblance to the coral snake; however, they are not malicious and pretty docile. 

Mexican Kingsnakes can grow up to five feet in length and come in various colors, including red, orange, yellow, and white. Although these snakes may seem intimidating at first glance, they are generally very docile.

6. Prairie Kingsnake

The Prairie Kingsnake is a non-venomous snake found in the central United States. It is a subspecies of the common kingsnake and is sometimes called the black-and-white kingsnake or the western kingsnake. These different types of kingsnakes are typically black with white bands around its body. 

It can grow about 3 feet long and is often found in open grasslands or prairies. They feed on frogs, small mammals, birds, lizards, and snakes. 

They are oviparous, meaning they lay eggs that hatch outside their bodies instead of living birth. They also have relatively mild temperaments compared to other types of snakes, such as rattlesnakes.

7. Santa Catalina Kingsnake

The Santa Catalina Kingsnake is a beautiful species of kingsnake that is endemic to the Santa Catalina Islands off the coast of California.

These snakes are small to medium in size, and their coloration can vary greatly depending on their island. Santa Catalina Kingsnakes are typically light brown or tan, with dark brown or black bands running across their body. 

Some individual snakes may have a bright yellow or orange band in the middle of their back. These different types of kingsnakes are non-venomous and harmless to humans.

8. Scarlet Kingsnake

The Scarlet Kingsnake is a beautiful snake found in the southeastern United States. They are typically red with black bands, but a variation is also entirely black. These snakes are non-venomous and relatively small, growing about 3 feet long. 

Scarlet Kingsnakes are great snakes for beginners because they are easy to care for and make great pets. Another benefit is that this species does not grow very large, so it does not take up too much space or have too big of an appetite.

If you are interested in getting one as a pet, it’s best to start by adopting one from a local animal shelter or rescue center rather than buying one from the pet store.

9. Short-tailed Snake

The short-tailed snake is a subspecies of the common kingsnake, and it is found in the southern United States, Mexico, and Central America. As its name suggests, the short-tailed snake has a shorter tail than other kingsnake subspecies. 

These different types of kingsnakes are typically black with white bands around their bodies. Short-tailed snakes can grow to be about 3 feet long. 

They are often confused with scarlet kingsnakes because they share similar patterns and colors. A fundamental way to tell them apart is by looking at the underside of their heads; if it’s brown or yellow, it’s likely a short-tailed snake.

10. Speckled Kingsnake

The Speckled Kingsnake is a beautiful subspecies of kingsnake native to the southeastern United States.

These snakes are typically black with white or yellow spots, but an albino morph of this species is also white with yellow spots. These different types of kingsnakes can grow to be around 3-4 feet long and are not considered evil.

Speckled Kingsnakes are great pets for those looking for a snake that is relatively easy to care for and is not too aggressive. These snakes typically eat rodents and do not need a large enclosure to live in.

11. Madrean Mountain Kingsnake

The Madrean Mountain Kingsnake is a subspecies of the Common Kingsnake. They are found in the mountains of Mexico and Arizona. These snakes are black with white bands around their bodies. 

They can grow to be about 3-4 feet long. Madrean Mountain Kingsnakes are non-venomous and are considered to be good pets. They eat small rodents, lizards, amphibians, eggs, and invertebrates. 

Madrean Mountain Kingsnakes have five toes on each foot. They have very smooth scales that give them an elegant appearance. Females lay eggs they will guard until they hatch out of the eggshells. 

These different types of kingsnakes may shed once or twice yearly if they live in warm climates. In cooler temperatures, they may only clear once annually or not!

12. Black Kingsnake

The black kingsnake is a non-venomous species found in North America. They get their name from their glossy black scales, which have a white or yellowish underside.

Black kingsnakes are often confused with the venomous coral snake but can be distinguished by their round pupils and lack of red bands. 

These snakes are shy but curious by nature and make great pets. Some common subspecies include the California black kingsnake and the Florida black kingsnake.

13. Arizona Mountain Kingsnake

The Arizona mountain kingsnake is a subspecies of the common kingsnake, and they are found in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. These different types of kingsnakes are black with white or light-colored bands. 

They grow to be about 3-4 feet long. Arizona mountain kingsnakes are nonvenomous and eat small mammals, lizards, and birds. 

It can live up to 20 years. They live in desert scrubland and montane conifer forests at elevations up to 8,000 feet above sea level. 

14. Desert Kingsnake

The desert kingsnake is a subspecies of the common kingsnake found in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Desert kingsnakes are small to medium-sized snakes, with adults reaching lengths of 2.5 to 3.5 feet (0.8 to 1.1 meters). 

These different types of kingsnakes are typically brown or tan, with dark brown or black bands running along their bodies. The belly of these snakes can be yellowish-brown, pinkish-white, or gray. 

15. Eastern Kingsnake

The Eastern Milksnake is a common kingsnake found throughout the eastern United States. They are non-venomous and grow to an average length of 3-4 feet. Eastern kingsnakes are typically gray or brown with black bands. 

These different types of kingsnakes are often confused with the cop, per heads, or rattlesnakes but can be distinguished by their lack of pits and round pupils.

Eastern kingsnakes are gentle snakes that make great pets. They do not have venom, so it is safe for children to handle them as long as they have adult supervision. 

The snake’s prey consists mainly of rodents such as mice and voles. It will also eat small lizards, frogs, bird eggs, and insects such as crickets and beetles.

Conclusion

There are many different types of kingsnakes, and each has its own unique set of colors and patterns. Some common types include the California kingsnake, Mexican black kingsnake, and corn snake

Each type of kingsnake is beautiful, and they all make great pets. If you’re thinking about getting a kingsnake, do some research to find the type that’s right for you.

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